December 12, 2017

Fish & Chips Day- The First Friday in June

The Fish and Chips is a delicacy that began as a basic meal of workers in newspaper and became a winning dish in restaurants.
Fish and Chips is a fried fish and potato chips served together, originally inside a piece of paper as a take away dish.
Fish and chips were invented on the shores of Britain in the mid-1800s mainly as food sold to fishermen and workers on the pier. Later, in 1900, the Fish and Chips became a symbol of British cuisine and tens of thousands of restaurants in the UK have already sold it.
In the 19th century, fishing in the North Sea was a major and important part of the developing world. Masses of people worked in the sea, fishing and shipping, and needed fast food.
The answer was the fried fish and chips that were the most available foods in the area (fish and potatoes). The Fish and Chips is a dish that characterized the working class who ate it shamelessly.

In 1858 a man named John Lee opened the first Fish & Chips restaurant in Oldham, England, and in 1863 Joseph Malin opened the first Fish & Chips restaurant as Take Away.  
Later, the dish that was so tasty spread throughout the United Kingdom, even to places far from the sea and reached the city centers. The immigrants who arrived in Australia, the United States and Canada brought the Fish and Chips with them, and from there the food has already reached other places in the world, thus crossing the border and becoming popular in many parts of the world. The Fish and Chips crossed not only geographical but also cultural and class boundaries, and became popular with many people, not just English and middle class. If you travel in England for example, you will find lots of stalls of their national food, every corner of the street.  
How to celebrate Fish & Chips?  
You can make fried fish with breadcrumbs on the side and wrap it all in newspaper. You can eat fish and chips in a restaurant, preferably with cold beer and best of it to go to the harbor, eat it in front of the ships, and imagine that you are harbor workers in the 19th century in England ...  

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