September 17, 2017

Constitution Day (or Citizenship Day) in the United States - September 17

US Constitution Day falls on September 17, the anniversary of the official signing of the American Constitution in 1787.
The Constitution of the United States is a document created in Pennsylvania, the United States, by hard work and many compromises by the indefatigable constitutional convention representatives - which led to an agreement between the US states that allows the central government the power to impose its decisions and allows the US to stand as an international force, While maintaining a reasonable level of independence in each country separately.
The Constitution, created in 1787, 11 years after the Declaration of Independence, is the supreme law, the highest and most binding legal instrument in the United States legal system and the foundation of the development of the United States as we know it today.
The Constitution of the United States is designed to protect the rights of the individual, equality of rights regardless of religion, race, gender and more.
In 1865, an amendment to the Constitution (No. 13) abolished slavery.
While the constitution was written, people of non-white races and women of all races were not allowed to vote in the elections. It was only in 1870 that the 15th Amendment to the Constitution allowed the Afro-Americans to vote. In 1920, women were allowed to exercise their democratic rights by the 19 th Amendment, and in 1924 the Native-Americans also had the right to vote.
Want to learn more about the US Constitution, answer trivia quizzes, design posters on the subject, etc.? Sign in to the United States Constitution (Constitution) website.

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