March 17, 2015

St. Patrick Day- 17th March

St. Patrick's Day is a Catholic Christian holiday.

Saint Patrick's Day is a holiday of the Irish and their descendants around the world. St. Patrick was a precursor of Christianity in Ireland. He is considered the patron protector of Christians and Irish on March 17th, this is the date of his death more than 1,500 years (he died on March 17, 491), the holiday is celebrated in memory.

Patrick grew up in an ordinary family and at the age of 16, Irish robbers raided his village and took him prisoner along with thousands of other people, to be sold as a slave in Ireland.
Before his capture, he was not observant, but in captivity has strengthened his faith. Over the years he worked in business is especially herders. When he was a loner with sheep, revealed to him according to Christian tradition, religious visions, which encouraged him escape from prison. He escaped from prison and returned to his family at the age of 22. These aromatic UK was chaos. Roman government collapsed, Christianity retreated and the pagan Saxons invaded the island. Patrick appeared in a vision in a dream told him to continue to spread Christianity in Britain. He was able to quickly and determination to organize the few Christians who were on the island, convert the kingdoms of the idols employees, and make the Church of Ireland an integral part of the Christian church in Europe, with headquarters in Rome.

More St. Patrick's accomplishments:
Patrick founded many monasteries, separated the monks and nuns.
Patrick was among the first who supported the abolition of slavery.
According to Christian belief widely held another extraordinary achievement attributed to Patrick is the expulsion of all the snakes from Ireland, though some attribute this to climate change, and some argue that this is actually the allegory that Druid priests expelled from the island.
 Patrick taught the people of Ireland to the Holy Trinity, according to the common Christian faith, and demonstrated this by cloverleaf triangle, which has since become a symbol of Ireland.

No comments:

Post a Comment